mRNA and Cancer Resarch in U. S. A - nabildeeb-syndrome- Dr.Nabil DEEB

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Dr. Nabil Abdul Kadir DEEB GERMANY – 53173 Bonn nabildeeb-syndrom, mRNA and APOBEC3 B - Research In the Nature Genetics | Analysis see the following research in U.S. A. more medical resarch about my medical reserchs nabildeeb-syndrome and mRNA / …… • I. • anorectal malformations associated with urologic and neurologic malformations caused by the effects of depleted uranium ( = DU ) on the stateless Palestinian refugee child Zina .- nabildeeb-syndrome . • See ! = 8/26/2012 www.paliraq.com • • anorectal malformations associated with urologic and neurologic malformations caused by the effects of depleted uranium ( = DU ) on the stateless Palestinian refugee child Zina . • nabildeeb-syndrome • Nabil DEEB • Arzt – Physician – Doctor • PMI-?rzteverein e.V. • Pal?stinamedico International ?rzteverein – ( P M I ) e.V. • Palestine Medico International Doctors Association ( P.M.I.) registered association • Department of Medical Research • Département de la recherche médicale • P.O. Box 20 10 53 • 53140 Bonn – Bad Godesberg / GERMANY • • e.mail: doctor.nabil.deeb.pmi.germany@googlemail.com • • Dr. Nabil Abdul Kadir DEEB • GERMANY 53137 Bonn • e.mail: doctor.nabil.deeb.pmi.germany@googlemail.com • • • • anorectal malformations associated with urologic and neurologic malformations caused by the effects of depleted uranium ( = DU ) on the stateless Palestinian refugee child Zina . • nabildeeb-syndrome • • Abstract :- • • The 3 years-old stateless Palestinian child Zina has since her birth a deformity of the colon, a major malformation of the anus and a fistula of the common pathology of the bladder and colon with an atrophy of the colon desendens. • The little girl Zina was operated on emergency and Colostomy (naturalis) Colostomy in the abdominal wall for defecation (in a collection bag) on the right colon asendens as a substitute for the anus, so can the little girl stay alive and for later the ascending colon , colon asendens`, to strengthen and further more for specific diagnoses and special operations. The little girl Zina must be re-operated on several occasions in a special pediatric surgery clinic specializing in pediatric surgery for rectal malformations and complications in the U.S., Canada or Europe. These diseases , anorectal malformations associated with urologic and neurologic malformations , of the child Zina are caused by the effects of depleted uranium ( = DU ) on the child Zina and on her mother during the early pregnancy of her mother in the IRAQ - BAGHDAD, because they lived in Baghdad in areas, where contamination depleted uranium ( = DU ) was and is high . • • The little girl, Zina Mohammed Hussein Al - Gazar • the effects of depleted uranium ( = DU) on the child Zinaanorectal malformations associated with urologic and : • neurologic malformations Colostomy (naturalis) Colostomy in the abdominal wall for defecation (in a collection bag) on the right colon asendens . • • the stateless Palestinian refugee child Zina • • Infection • • Colostomy (naturalis) Colostomy in the abdominal wall for defecation (in a collection bag) on the right colon asendens as a substitute for the anus, so can the little girl stay alive the stateless Palestinian refugee child Zina . • • • The little girl, Zina Mohammed Hussein Al - Gazar • the effects of depleted uranium ( = DU) on the child Zinaanorectal malformations associated with urologic and : • neurologic malformations Colostomy (naturalis) Colostomy in the abdominal wall for defecation (in a collection bag) on the right colon asendens • The little girl, Zina Mohammed Hussein Al - Gazar was born at 02. November 2009 in Baghdad - Iraq. She is a child stateless Palestinian refugee, and living at the time of political unrest and expelled from Iraq in the UNHCR - the refugee camp in the desert between Iraq and Syria on Syrian territory under temporary in care and contactor of the UNHCR and waits with her parents and two healthy sisters to live in a country anywhere in the world through the agency, UNHCR – Geneva . • When the intake of these above mentioned refugees is uncertain and often lasts two to five years waiting in UNHCR - refugee camp in the desert near the Iraqi-Syrian border . • The 3-years-old girl suffering from birth under "" Anorectal malformation "" (= congenital malformations of the rectum and the anus) as a result of the developmental disorder of embryo in the early stages of pregnancy of her mother because of the radiation depleting effect of the environment in the home of their mother in Baghdad . • It was a temporary colostomy (colostomy =) at the university hospitals - Baghdad in March 2010 created the child, give the child a temporary chair to give way, which is for her vital moment . • Another treatment for the child in the Palestinian desert in a refugees camp was and still is not possible for many reasons . • The child needs urgent and more vital operational treatment as a pulling operation (posterior sagittal anorectal PSARP = plastic) with a minimally invasive surgery is used . • Such further treatment in a special children's surgery – clinic for example in U.S.A , Canada , in Europe, for example in ,Finland, Norway, Sweden, France or in the Federal Republic of Germany in a department of pediatric surgery . • The three-years-old girl Zina is waiting since her birth to 02 November 2009 with her two little healthy sisters and her parents in the desert between the Iraqi and Syrian deserts in - the refugees UNHCR camp to a reasonable medical surgical treatment in a country . • Without appropriate treatment for the child's life little girl Zina would be destroyed forever because permanent serious infections and cancer degeneration . • In this context, I refer-so called International Humanitarian Law . • In comparison to the treatment of children in the rest of the world as in Europe , Canada or the U. S. A . • • • These diseases , anorectal malformations associated with urologic and neurologic malformations , of the child Zina are caused by the effects of depleted uranium (DU DU) on the child Zina and on her mother during the early pregnancy of her mother in the IRAQ - BAGHDAD, because they lived in Baghdad in areas where the contamination depleted uranium ( = DU ) was and is high. • • The leukemia, birth defects, miscarriages, genetic damage in humans, especially in pregnant women and children, and traumatic injury in the toxic depleted uranium war against the Palestinian people in GAZA Strip and in IRAQ: - • In many regions of the world in which children are exposed to political unrest and wars to military weapons. • In the above-mentioned. Study "," Trends in Childhood Leukemia in Basrah, Iraq, 1993-2007 "," could prove to the American colleagues, increased diseases of children with leukemia at the widespread use of depleted uranium are strong. • Depleted uranium in the senseless, chemo massive nuclear war against the Palestinian people the GAZA Strip and the IRAQ: - • • Uranium projectiles were used in the Palestinian GAZA Strip by the Israeli occupying forces against GAZA - strips. • Among the many Palestinians who were killed just before the war in Gaza, joins the effected either continuously by the effects of depleted uranium ( = DU ) or by a combination of causes increasing numbers of sick and dead, there are mainly children and adolescents. The outbreak of the disease, in the case of DU poisoning can be up to 50 years away, the current numbers are just the beginning. • The effects of DU cover a period of up to several thousands of years, and are therefore never be undone (for literature). • On the whole GAZA territory, waters, air, vegetation and the animals have been severely poisoned. And as for the people, so fast the disease and the deaths at an incredible speed in the air. • Effects of depleted uranium munitions: - • Uranium is one of the elements with the highest specific weight and the highest density. • Health caused by depleted uranium: - • Disease, all living things - not just people - come to the uranium munitions and the Uranium oxide in contact: defense workers in the production of ammunition, soldiers during transport, the camps and when shooting the ammunition, all living in the area of operation and all living things, the food consume from the mission area, because the uranium can also access via the food chain in the body. Uranium oxide of 2.5 micron size, no one can see, smell or taste. When are ingested with food particles of uranium, only 0.2% through the gut into the body, the rest is excreted in the feces. Mainly, uranium oxide is inhaled, enter the lung tissue, and thus into the blood. You are in the body fluids is very difficult to dissolve. They are stored mainly in the skeleton, which serves as a long-term depot. • The "biological" half life "is the time in which half of the absorbed uranium is excreted. It is definitely longer than a year. • Through the bloodstream, the uranium enters the liver and kidneys, where it poisons the cells. The acute risk to health exists in a chemical poisoning by the heavy metal uranium, similar to a cadmium or lead poisoning, only it takes is a much smaller amount of it. With continued steady supply of small quantities of uranium from the bone store the nephrotoxic effects of other environmental toxins we are exposed is amplified. • • The acute heavy metal poisoning by uranium leads to malfunctioning of kidneys and liver, to the lethal loss of function. The damaged liver is unable to protein synthesis and the colloid osmotic pressure is necessary to maintain, shall enter the water out into the abdominal cavity. The injured kidney is unable to excrete the water. • Second Health damage caused by low radiation doses: - • The chronic uranium poisoning leads to AIDS - like immune deficiency or cancer, especially leukemia. Also natural radioactivity caused a number of cancers, because there are no harmless low radiation. Since the uranium is stored in the bones, there is the starting point of the low-level radiation. The tissue that is in-rays is closest to the bone marrow, the organ inaReichweite of the blood cells and immune cells are formed. If this immune and blood forming organs contaminated with radiation, there is a severe form of anemia (aplastic anemia), for cancers such as leukemia or other malignant neoplasms or immune deficiency. Consequences of the immune defect is most severe histories of measles and polio, salmonella and worm infections , herpes and Zoster skin diseases . • When the skin contact with depleted uranium it comes to slow-healing wounds with painless ulcers. Therefore, they are painless because the pain-sensing and conducting sensory and nerve cells have been destroyed. • Finally, is caused by the depleted uranium genetic damage. There is a cluster of miscarriages, stillbirths and birth children unviable. • Uranium poisoning of parents living with children were born following congenital malformations: - • • hydrocephalus with cranial nerve disorder and dementia • phocomelia, a severe malformation of the extremities, such as after thalidomide • • lack of cartilage formation in the lower extremities • malformation of one leg with one hand grasping function • malformation of legs, growing together of the fingers and toes • Cleft lip and cleft palate • abdominal gap • • Spina bifida, cleft of the spinal column. During the second World War was planning in October 1943 by Germany a large-scale radioactive contamination of the war. At this time of year is also developing "special bullets" back. The U.S. intelligence had received from this knowledge, however. • DU shells were of the Allied troops in the Gulf War in 1991 applied for the first time, with devastating effects and consequences. • • Ref. See nabildeeb:- • http://www.springermedizin.at/artikel/18287-neue-therapie-bei-blutkrebs-in-aussicht • I.:- II. Evidence for APOBEC3B mutagenesis in multiple human cancers • Michael B Burns, • Nuri A Temiz • & Reuben S Harris Nature Genetics (2013) doi:10.1038/ng.2701 Published online 14 July 2013 • Abstract • Abstract• • References• • Author information• • Supplementary information Thousands of somatic mutations accrue in most human cancers, and their causes are largely unknown. We recently showed that the DNA cytidine deaminase APOBEC3B accounts for up to half of the mutational load in breast carcinomas expressing this enzyme. Here we address whether APOBEC3B is broadly responsible for mutagenesis in multiple tumor types. We analyzed gene expression data and mutation patterns, distributions and loads for 19 different cancer types, with over 4,800 exomes and 1,000,000 somatic mutations. Notably, APOBEC3B is upregulated, and its preferred target sequence is frequently mutated and clustered in at least six distinct cancers: bladder, cervix, lung (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma), head and neck, and breast. Interpreting these findings in the light of previous genetic, cellular and biochemical studies, the most parsimonious conclusion from these global analyses is that APOBEC3B-catalyzed genomic uracil lesions are responsible for a large proportion of both dispersed and clustered mutations in multiple distinct cancers. View full text At a glance Figures First | 1-3 of 4 | Last view all figures left 1. Figure 1 2. Figure 2 3. Figure 3 4. Figure 4 right References • Abstract• • References• • Author information• • Supplementary information 1. Stephens, P. et al. 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AID-GFP chimeric protein increases hypermutation of Ig genes with no evidence of nuclear localization. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 7003–7008 (2002). o CAS o ADS o PubMed o Article 50. Land, A.M. et al. Endogenous APOBEC3A DNA cytosine deaminase is cytoplasmic and non-genotoxic. J. Biol. Chem. 288, 17253–17260 (2013). o CAS o PubMed o Article Download references Author information • Abstract• • References• • Author information• • Supplementary information Affiliations 1. Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. o Michael B Burns, o Nuri A Temiz & o Reuben S Harris 2. Masonic Cancer Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. o Michael B Burns, o Nuri A Temiz & o Reuben S Harris 3. Institute for Molecular Virology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. o Michael B Burns & o Reuben S Harris 4. Center for Genome Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA. o Michael B Burns & o Reuben S Harris.

10/8/2013


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